.mountains – mural on d wall

*I know I know… this is art blog and d last 2 posts are not about art, but what can I do… they were in front of my eyes in d moment when I decide to update my blog. OK, let’s start!

We haven’t have graffiti post for a while and this is amazing opportunity to share this arty urban art project so called ”shanshuihua” that is actually new artwork on d wall in Foshan city, China. U like it? It’s combination of abstract art, expressionism and good technique of painting graff shadows ~ Hua Tunan is great! Mural full of mountains! amazing – indeed!

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:happy b.day Sir Pollock, Jackson Pollock

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:yesterday already in my part of d world but only in a minutes [28 of January] was d 100th birthday of d one of d most famous painters in d history of arts, one of d inventors, that leads d Abstract Expressionism style in contemporary arts. I had d pleasure to enjoy his works around d big galleries and is not possible to skip this birthday. in my world he left big traces, in d way how I understand d art when I write about also as when I’m in my atelier working on my new works.

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Morteza Nikoubazl / Reuters

A Tehran Art University student looks at a painting by 20th century U.S. artist Jackson Pollock at Tehran’s Museum of Contemporary Art on June 19, 2010. Artists like Monet, Picasso and Warhol were considered revolutionary in their day, but their works were not much appreciated by the leaders of Iran’s Islamic revolution and many were kept out of view for decades. Now, one of the greatest collections of contemporary Western art — put together under a Western-leaning monarchy in pre-revolutionary Iran — is open to the public, with some works on display for the first time in more than 30 years.

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:fast painting, with a lot of emotions, moves. .. deep expressions, war between d blue and d red. I don’t know maybe more then 10 times I enjoy his works in Pompidou Museum in France. I use to go there and enjoy d docs where is recorded Pollock and his process of creating, lots of conversations how he connect almost all o d elements that surround him  with expressing trough d brush with one single move. standing n a frond of his huge paintings it’s fantasy, maybe d best part of my life till now. He is considered a revolutionary painter and well known for his ‘drip’ paintings, that involved pouring paint onto large raw canvases on the floor. Pollock currently holds the title for the world’s most expensive painting ever sold, when David Geffen sold his “No.5, 1948” for $140 million through Sotheby’s in 2006.

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An undated handout photograph shows Jackson Pollock’s “Blue Poles, Number 11, 1952” in the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra which was purchased a quarter of century ago for A$1.3 million ($975,000) and is now estimated to be worth A$115 million ($86.25 million).

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In between u see pictures from his life, there will be in future more posts for his master works cause as I mention he is one of my influences not directly but with d philosophy and d messages that he shared. .. connect with nature,respect diversity and much more are pretty motivating for me. :HAPPY BIRTHDAY Pollock, Jackson Pollock!

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.this is that great artist, master of d moderna, expressionist?!. .. more then that. if u haven’t made a research for Him till now go and read for His life, u’ll be impressed for sure. in meanwhile u like d things that u saw here? . .. u can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og ::: #facebook page

:sticky time_mood: tape & space

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Nice one :)

. ..and it’s only black tape. This is really wonderful mind, like I see some neurons, or muscle strings, nerves or whaeva’ 🙂

great way to express ambitions idea, I only find this as info on tumblr ‘Monika Grzymala, Sticky Tape and on dozeen Miles & Miles of Sticky Tape ::: I’m not even sure if this are d right names of this installations, or do they have name actually but d concept is pretty sticky anyway .. 😉

Polish artist Monika Grzymala use lengths of black and white sticky tape, she applies adhesive tape directly to gallery walls to create three-dimensional drawings that can both wrap around corners and project outwards.

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:from Sumarria Lunn Gallery [via dezeen] we read:
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Monika Grzymala was born in Zabrze, Poland in 1970. Having moved to Germany with her family in 1980, she went on to study stone sculpture and restoration. It was only when a professor observed that her interest appeared to lie not in the objects themselves, but the relationships between them that the nature of her work changed. She stopped making sculpture and focused on drawing, exploring the basics of line and mark.

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“Very quickly my line left the page and continued on the walls”
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Western history has been preoccupied with drawing since records began. Indeed, many of these records are drawings themselves. From the illuminations in medieval manuscripts, through Renaissance depictions of the human form, to minimalist constructions made solely of lines, drawing has maintained its place in art. Grzymala references this sense of tradition, but sharply updates the practice by teasing it out of two-dimensions and out of its traditional medium.

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“Her mastery and imagination have taken the liberation of drawing a step beyond what was accomplished by those who came before.”

Describing her use of materials in terms of distance rather than weight or amount, Grzymala claims her works are more akin to performance than conventional installation. By measuring her used spools of tape in length rather than number, she documents the physical effort she invests in every work.

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“Time is a very important component of my work. The pieces are all
like time capsules.”
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Each work is site-specific – created in response to the conditions and configuration of a given space. For an exhibition in New York 8.3 kilometers of black and white adhesive tape seemed to hurtle across the gallery walls, turn corners, then leap off the wall to wrap around a pillar. At London’s The Drawing Room the artist’s installation documented her response to the chaotic London skyline using kilometers of white and grey sticky tape to fill each corner of the gallery.

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“Whenever I leave a work, I feel as if I leave a part of me, a part of my body behind… there’s a connection – an invisible line from Berlin to London to New York.”

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.I think she's amazing, she also uses d color one.. :)

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!expressionism in his perfection, powerful moves, pretty chaotically way of showing ur feelings, what do u say? :u like her works. .. u can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og ::: #facebook page

:just a bit about Helen Frankenthaler #rip

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:ebbing

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.What I wanted to write about today is one other shocking news that I read in newspaper yesterday, actually today but very early in d morning hours. Strange coincidence, I didn’t know that this will be d dynamic & d line for writing about them. First it was Sir John Chamberlain then she. They both died in such a small time distance, actually like in d art history. .. they produce in d same time, they create in same period of d last century.

Helen Frankenthaler [10 December 2009 – December 27, 2011] is one of America’s most distinguished living artists. Born in New York City in 1928, Frankenthaler attended the Dalton school where she studied under Rufino Tamayo and later graduated from Bennington College in Vermont. Upon returning to New York, she quickly became a notable personality among the avant-garde art world and New York School of painters, which included David Smith, Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Franz Kline, Adolph Gottlieb, Barnett Newman, and influential critic Clement Greenberg, an early champion of her work.

#RIP for both. I am truly grateful to these two artists – my deepest influences… since always I’ve been impressed from deconstructivism, and when I saw d smashed cars in Pompidou from John I was stunned.. not like in d history of art book.. and in d same building I was surprised for d first time from d simplicity and d naive approach that Helen use in her abstract works but still so much zen.

Devil's Mist, 1967, Acrylic on canvas

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to me they both achieved the purest level of abstraction, equivalent to zen in every sense of it…I have always admired the simplicity in both, and Motherwell’s Open series had the strongest impact out of all abstract expressionists. “ says Milica Popovic, friend of mine, Assistant Professor Art/Jean B. King Gallery Manager at College of Southern Idaho

. ..not for nothing they were/ are influence for most of d good abstract painters nowadays. it’s probably pretty hard to find d balance and d peace inside ur chaos, especially when u have a lot of colors around u. the sources of her abstract imagery reflected her impressions of landscape, her meditations on personal experience and the pleasures of dealing with paint.

Blue Reach, 1974, Acrylic on canvas

nytimes write in article about her:

Helen Frankenthaler, the lyrically abstract painter whose technique of staining pigment into raw canvas helped shape an influential art movement in the mid-20th century and who became one of the most admired artists of her generation, known as a second-generation Abstract Expressionist, she was married during the movement’s heyday to the painter Robert Motherwell, a leading first-generation member of the group. But she departed from the first generation’s romantic search for the “sublime” to pursue her own path.

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.To d Abstract Expressionism as movement she brought a new, open airiness to the painted surface and was credited with releasing color from the gestural approach also as romantic rhetoric. When I saw her paintings probably d first 15 minutes I was in some deep meditation that was product from d combination that she makes with d colors.

The landscapes were in my arms as I did it,” Ms. Frankenthaler told an interviewer. “I didn’t realize all that I was doing. I was trying to get at something — I didn’t know what until it was manifest”.

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@ Ameringer McEnery Yohe

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.what I want to mention here and is off topic is d approach that we [d bloggers] have for writing . I’ve met a lot of people that have their own blogs and write whatever they want about, but also thousands and thousands of ezine, web pages, art studios etc just copy/ paste d information and d future that I don’t want to predict is that not so much time after we’ll fulfill all d net space, with trashy, basic information only because we don’t have our personal opinion but we are still blogging. That’s d main difference between this blog and d others. Here we take care about d artists and their artworks.

Mountains and Sea,” her breakthrough in pink, blue and green, set a style that critics — although not universally — have applauded for its lyricism and luminous use of color – we read today in latimes

:current Times art critic Christopher Knight has described Frankenthaler as a “minor, formalist artist,” and her influential “Mountains and Sea” as a “slight innovation.”

Helen also as John, I don’t know why this parallel. ..win a lot of awards and is been part of many great collections around d world, in ones of d best galleries and exhibit spaces, she received the National Medal of Arts from President George W. Bush in 2002.

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..besides this technique “soak-stain” and turned to acrylic paints in the 1960s to explore open, flat fields of colour, a style on display in her 1973 work Nature Abhors A Vacuum. she also worked with ceramics, sculpture, woodcuts, tapestry, printmaking…

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:district 1966

:Bacchus

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.that what me as person find in her works is that meditative line that brings tranquility in me. D green we all know that is good for relaxation and she use it pretty much, d other ones that are more simple remind me of miro, don’t know why they compare her with pollock, maybe cause she was painting on d ground same as him and start using big canvases.. but definitely she brings poetry in her master pieces. It was like this for me when I enjoy her works, and for d end to mention one more tiem “She was not the first artist to stain canvases but she was the firsy to develop a complete formal vocabulary from the technique.”

“I’ve explored a variety of directions and themes over the years. But I think in my painting you can see the signature of one artist, the work of one wrist.”

-Helen Frankenthaler

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@ Ameringer McEnery Yohe

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Rest in Peace dear Helen, u was good teacher to ur followers. ..we can see ur signature in lots of paintings nowadays. the funny part with d abstract painters is that not all of them are academic painters and they are not pretty sure what are they creating. ..hope they will find d way to you & ur art signature.

:are u seeing Helen Frankenthaler masterpieces for first time, u know them from before? – u can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og ::: #facebook page

:just a bit about John Chamberlain #rip

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:gagosian

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.first of All, Rest in Peace Sir & thanks for all d progress!

I would like to mention on my blog for one of d first modern sculptors in d art history. Inventive for d time when he start with his creativity work and pretty unique to be part of d history as respected artist that was promoting d diversity of expression nowadays. It’s hard to find ur own signature, to be something that shows d quality of d artist also as d topic he is working on.

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John Angus Chamberlain [ b.April 16, 1927 – d. December 21, 2011] was American sculptor that is best known for creating sculptures from old automobiles (or parts of) that bring the Abstract Expressionist style of painting into three dimensions ..

His works have been exhibited around the world and have been included in the São Paulo Art Biennial (1961, 1994), the Venice Biennale (1964), the Whitney Biennial (1973, 1987) and Documenta, Kassel, Germany (1982) and he has had over 100 solo shows, traveling exhibitions, and retrospectives.

:d art artstory.org writes:

“he is creating vibrantly colored, dynamic sculptures from crushed, twisted and bent automobile parts. Inspired by the scale, color and impulsive creation of Abstract Expressionist work, Chamberlain was a pioneering force through his use of found materials and diverse colors. While also experimenting with a variety of sculptural media, as well as with film and painting, he greatly impacted many generations of artistic movements, including Minimalism and Pop Art, and continues to create inventive work today.”

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Key Ideas
  • Chamberlain retains the jagged edges and unrefined paint colors of his primary medium – steel automobile parts – to illustrate his spontaneous, improvisational process. This technique brings the instinctual and gestural brushstrokes of his Abstract Expressionist peers into three dimensions.
  • Rejecting the frequent comparison of his work to violent car crashes, Chamberlain intends his audience to view his work aesthetically without preconceived ideas about the materials’ past. He aims to give everyday objects entirely new meanings, ranging from poetic abstraction to figural allusion.
  • A main concept for Chamberlain is the idea of “fit,” a natural, innate interconnection between sections of his sculptures. Rather than predetermining structures, he lets the fragments’ shapes and colors dictate composition.

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:In d bulletin we can find this part that highlight part of his life and maybe d main reason why he start using this stuffs as material for his art.

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Automobiles are a loaded subject, especially in the decades following World War II in the United States, which has led some observers to ascribe specific social meanings to Chamberlain’s art. The crushed automobiles have been connected to the violent death of Abstract Expressionist painter Jackson Pollock — who died in a car crash in 1956 — and then to the slightly later, 1960s car-crash paintings of Pop artist Andy Warhol. Chamberlain was skeptical. Of his choice of automobile sheet metal, the artist once said, “Michelangelo had a lot of marble in his backyard, so to speak; I had a lot of this stuff.

Using a common material is best for sculpture, he added, because it “doesn’t get in the way of doing an uncommon thing.

The Line Up Dedicated to the Sarasota Police Dept_1982

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.In 1957 after his first work called Shortstop & made out of two fenders repeatedly run over by a truck we read from guardian.co.uk part of that what he said in that time:

“It was like, God, I finally found an art supply, and it was so cheap it just made you laugh,” he later said. “I think of my art materials not as junk but as garbage. Manure, actually: it goes from being the waste material of one being to the life-source of another.”

Rev. E. Piscpalian Swifty 2oo5

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.d Guggenheim museum in New York is preparing retrospective exhibition from his works in February. We can see nearly 100 pieces from his earliest monochromatic welded iron-rod sculptures to the large-scale foil creations of recent years. But if ur not in US and u are interested in this artist and his works and still between my lines, hope u like d selection that I’ve done for d white blog.

:witchesoasis 2o11

Onecaratstud, 2010

;gagosian

Day Flotilla 1982

flywheelsonata 2oo7

:gagosian

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do u like his style, u think he left traces for d future generations? . ..u can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og ::: #facebook page