:happy b.day Sir Pollock, Jackson Pollock

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:yesterday already in my part of d world but only in a minutes [28 of January] was d 100th birthday of d one of d most famous painters in d history of arts, one of d inventors, that leads d Abstract Expressionism style in contemporary arts. I had d pleasure to enjoy his works around d big galleries and is not possible to skip this birthday. in my world he left big traces, in d way how I understand d art when I write about also as when I’m in my atelier working on my new works.

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Morteza Nikoubazl / Reuters

A Tehran Art University student looks at a painting by 20th century U.S. artist Jackson Pollock at Tehran’s Museum of Contemporary Art on June 19, 2010. Artists like Monet, Picasso and Warhol were considered revolutionary in their day, but their works were not much appreciated by the leaders of Iran’s Islamic revolution and many were kept out of view for decades. Now, one of the greatest collections of contemporary Western art — put together under a Western-leaning monarchy in pre-revolutionary Iran — is open to the public, with some works on display for the first time in more than 30 years.

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:fast painting, with a lot of emotions, moves. .. deep expressions, war between d blue and d red. I don’t know maybe more then 10 times I enjoy his works in Pompidou Museum in France. I use to go there and enjoy d docs where is recorded Pollock and his process of creating, lots of conversations how he connect almost all o d elements that surround him  with expressing trough d brush with one single move. standing n a frond of his huge paintings it’s fantasy, maybe d best part of my life till now. He is considered a revolutionary painter and well known for his ‘drip’ paintings, that involved pouring paint onto large raw canvases on the floor. Pollock currently holds the title for the world’s most expensive painting ever sold, when David Geffen sold his “No.5, 1948” for $140 million through Sotheby’s in 2006.

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An undated handout photograph shows Jackson Pollock’s “Blue Poles, Number 11, 1952” in the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra which was purchased a quarter of century ago for A$1.3 million ($975,000) and is now estimated to be worth A$115 million ($86.25 million).

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In between u see pictures from his life, there will be in future more posts for his master works cause as I mention he is one of my influences not directly but with d philosophy and d messages that he shared. .. connect with nature,respect diversity and much more are pretty motivating for me. :HAPPY BIRTHDAY Pollock, Jackson Pollock!

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.this is that great artist, master of d moderna, expressionist?!. .. more then that. if u haven’t made a research for Him till now go and read for His life, u’ll be impressed for sure. in meanwhile u like d things that u saw here? . .. u can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og ::: #facebook page

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:just a bit about Helen Frankenthaler #rip

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:ebbing

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.What I wanted to write about today is one other shocking news that I read in newspaper yesterday, actually today but very early in d morning hours. Strange coincidence, I didn’t know that this will be d dynamic & d line for writing about them. First it was Sir John Chamberlain then she. They both died in such a small time distance, actually like in d art history. .. they produce in d same time, they create in same period of d last century.

Helen Frankenthaler [10 December 2009 – December 27, 2011] is one of America’s most distinguished living artists. Born in New York City in 1928, Frankenthaler attended the Dalton school where she studied under Rufino Tamayo and later graduated from Bennington College in Vermont. Upon returning to New York, she quickly became a notable personality among the avant-garde art world and New York School of painters, which included David Smith, Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Franz Kline, Adolph Gottlieb, Barnett Newman, and influential critic Clement Greenberg, an early champion of her work.

#RIP for both. I am truly grateful to these two artists – my deepest influences… since always I’ve been impressed from deconstructivism, and when I saw d smashed cars in Pompidou from John I was stunned.. not like in d history of art book.. and in d same building I was surprised for d first time from d simplicity and d naive approach that Helen use in her abstract works but still so much zen.

Devil's Mist, 1967, Acrylic on canvas

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to me they both achieved the purest level of abstraction, equivalent to zen in every sense of it…I have always admired the simplicity in both, and Motherwell’s Open series had the strongest impact out of all abstract expressionists. “ says Milica Popovic, friend of mine, Assistant Professor Art/Jean B. King Gallery Manager at College of Southern Idaho

. ..not for nothing they were/ are influence for most of d good abstract painters nowadays. it’s probably pretty hard to find d balance and d peace inside ur chaos, especially when u have a lot of colors around u. the sources of her abstract imagery reflected her impressions of landscape, her meditations on personal experience and the pleasures of dealing with paint.

Blue Reach, 1974, Acrylic on canvas

nytimes write in article about her:

Helen Frankenthaler, the lyrically abstract painter whose technique of staining pigment into raw canvas helped shape an influential art movement in the mid-20th century and who became one of the most admired artists of her generation, known as a second-generation Abstract Expressionist, she was married during the movement’s heyday to the painter Robert Motherwell, a leading first-generation member of the group. But she departed from the first generation’s romantic search for the “sublime” to pursue her own path.

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.To d Abstract Expressionism as movement she brought a new, open airiness to the painted surface and was credited with releasing color from the gestural approach also as romantic rhetoric. When I saw her paintings probably d first 15 minutes I was in some deep meditation that was product from d combination that she makes with d colors.

The landscapes were in my arms as I did it,” Ms. Frankenthaler told an interviewer. “I didn’t realize all that I was doing. I was trying to get at something — I didn’t know what until it was manifest”.

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@ Ameringer McEnery Yohe

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.what I want to mention here and is off topic is d approach that we [d bloggers] have for writing . I’ve met a lot of people that have their own blogs and write whatever they want about, but also thousands and thousands of ezine, web pages, art studios etc just copy/ paste d information and d future that I don’t want to predict is that not so much time after we’ll fulfill all d net space, with trashy, basic information only because we don’t have our personal opinion but we are still blogging. That’s d main difference between this blog and d others. Here we take care about d artists and their artworks.

Mountains and Sea,” her breakthrough in pink, blue and green, set a style that critics — although not universally — have applauded for its lyricism and luminous use of color – we read today in latimes

:current Times art critic Christopher Knight has described Frankenthaler as a “minor, formalist artist,” and her influential “Mountains and Sea” as a “slight innovation.”

Helen also as John, I don’t know why this parallel. ..win a lot of awards and is been part of many great collections around d world, in ones of d best galleries and exhibit spaces, she received the National Medal of Arts from President George W. Bush in 2002.

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..besides this technique “soak-stain” and turned to acrylic paints in the 1960s to explore open, flat fields of colour, a style on display in her 1973 work Nature Abhors A Vacuum. she also worked with ceramics, sculpture, woodcuts, tapestry, printmaking…

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:district 1966

:Bacchus

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.that what me as person find in her works is that meditative line that brings tranquility in me. D green we all know that is good for relaxation and she use it pretty much, d other ones that are more simple remind me of miro, don’t know why they compare her with pollock, maybe cause she was painting on d ground same as him and start using big canvases.. but definitely she brings poetry in her master pieces. It was like this for me when I enjoy her works, and for d end to mention one more tiem “She was not the first artist to stain canvases but she was the firsy to develop a complete formal vocabulary from the technique.”

“I’ve explored a variety of directions and themes over the years. But I think in my painting you can see the signature of one artist, the work of one wrist.”

-Helen Frankenthaler

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@ Ameringer McEnery Yohe

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Rest in Peace dear Helen, u was good teacher to ur followers. ..we can see ur signature in lots of paintings nowadays. the funny part with d abstract painters is that not all of them are academic painters and they are not pretty sure what are they creating. ..hope they will find d way to you & ur art signature.

:are u seeing Helen Frankenthaler masterpieces for first time, u know them from before? – u can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og ::: #facebook page

‘cobra_d way of dancing with colors

Today, my friend from twitter & facebook Andrew Crane share this amazing video work where we have d opportunity to see this great artist, amsterdamishen Karel Appel in d moment of work/ pleasure/ new experience. .. I have a lot of other places from where I can share only d video or just d link, without opinion but this technique and style of painting I really want to mention here in this blog.

I have had experiences like this also and I really hope in future to have d ability of traveling inside me again and doin’ this wonderful yoga with d canvas. someones thinks that this is fight, expression of negative feelings some are thinking d opposite, making love with that what’s ur spirit, wind that guides u trough d process of creating. well, it costs a lot of money, especially if u want to do that with oil colors and still we need to become directors or curators in some galleries first  😉

.What a miss that I didn’t know about this video till now, I really like this „cobra“ style of expression. .. and d tea moment on d end of the video, priceless*. He use to say “If I paint like a barbarian, it’s because we live in a barbarous age” about his technique of bringing those hidden feelings out of his soul.

from wikipedia we read: Christiaan Karel Appel (25 April 1921 – 3 May 2006) was a Dutch painter, sculptor, and poet. He started painting at the age of fourteen and studied at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam in the 1940s. He was one of the founders of the avant-garde movement Cobra in 1948.

The Wild Firemen 1947

..more extraordinary were his associations with people from totally different artistic genres. In the 1980s and 90s he produced intriguing combinations of painting and visual poetry with Allen Ginsberg, while in 1987 he worked with the Japanese choreographer Min Tanaka on Can we Dance a Landscape? at the Opéra Comique in Paris – a performance set against a background of bright landscapes, feline faces and spotted cows on wheels. The reviews were mixed.

Helen A. Harrison for d The New York Times in 1981, said that Cobra’s major achievement “was in fostering an amalgam of aspects of the major trends in contemporary artistic thinking” with “the dark, mystical Northern sensibility that gives their work its peculiar character, so appropriate to postwar Europe.
She also added: “In short, they seem to have been able to express both optimism and anxiety at the same time.”

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It’s a video from d early 6o’s [’62] where d artist/ painter show his childish way of communication with canvas & d colors. Every second he is deeper in his inner personality and from that dialog he write trough d spectra of fast, naive moves amazing moments, pictures that create inside u unique feeling.

:composition

Very important artist in d plead of contemporary history of art, that left behind a lot of works that are pretty respected from d art community and mostly if u’re interested u can see them in d most important museums & galleries around d world. Besides this stunning paintings in his collection of works we can find sculptures, drawings, litho & prints.

As we mention he was poet/ thinker also, so for d end of this first post on my blog for this great artist I’ll share few of d quotes that I found googling about him:

– (artists are people) who employ matter between birth and death. Matter is something to use, not possess.

– Every day I have to be awake to escape… …The whole world is sleepy. It is a real fight to be awake, to see everything new, for the first time in your life.

– I’m not a pessimist. Maybe I don’t have a primitive feeling of happiness, that is true. Sometimes my color is happy but not the expression.

:Aelta Andre, colorful universe in d ‘innocent eye’ of a kid

:Butterfly Nebula number one

:have u seen this miracle? I do d same activities with d kids & d teenagers that are participants on my workshops, but this parents are awesome. they realize d colorful dream that this girl creates and support Aelta Andre in her painting.

:Dinosaur IslandsShe have amazing visions and rarely professional approach that helped her to have exhibitions in d most prestige galleries. She starts with 1-2 and never stop with d will for exploring trough d colors. d creativity that she presents is bit naive in a way but very soft and subtle in other side. d strong connection that she build with d art is amazing start of her life in general.

for my point this is more then motivation for d young parents also for all of Us who are in some way part of d education process that d youngsters have. if we give all d freedom to this future generations all that we can receive is pure beauty. free love flying trough d colors on d canvases, this little hands produce magic.

she creates her own cosmos, metamorphoses trough d smell of d colors in d atelier. should we make d clothes full with colors today again? yes, d new universes are ready to come. positive vibration, bless & bliss for this girls & for all of them out there creative & inspiring youngsters as she.

:Peacock in Space

This is a 13 minute film highlighting the abstract child painter, Aelta Andre, at work in her studio.