:don’t ask why, #because. ..

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!awesome piece of art from d leading Sydney-based Malaysian artist, Simryn Gill. she is amazing and pretty popular out there in d art circles, have had expos all around like in d Tate Modern, London d most important galleries in New York, Washington, Germany, Australia. .. etc.

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:this art work gives u d ability to think, it’s a tricky thinking process that puts inside everyone who is willing to try, to give few answers, so many different topics as many as papers inside 🙂

Simryn Gill often use objects, books, collections, photographs and text pieces for her works and she explores the artist’s pursuit of meaning through materials, forms and ways of working, such as collecting, reading, archiving, arranging, casting and photographing.

:she creates using interactive ways, connects with d audience, animates them somehow. ..u can google her if u want to learn more about her works, she is interesting, I want to mention..

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?u think is engaging, u like d concept. .. u can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og ::: #facebook page

:stickers, yea. ..dot stickers!

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:d post before [ok, few posts before] was for sticking tape, black and white, but mostly black. Now we’ll play a little with stickers, yea, stickers, in all colors. 😉

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- what Is all about?

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Last December, in a surprisingly simple yet ridiculously amazing installation for the Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane, artist Yayoi Kusama constructed a large domestic environment, painting every wall, chair, table, piano, and household decoration a brilliant white, effectively serving as a giant white canvas. Over the course of two weeks, the museum’s smallest visitors were given thousands upon thousands of colored dot stickers and were invited to collaborate in the transformation of the space, turning the house into a vibrantly mottled explosion of color. How great is this? Given the opportunity my son could probably cover the entire piano alone in about fifteen minutes. The installation, entitled The Obliteration Room, is part of Kusama’s Look Now, See Forever exhibition that runs through March 12. (via stuart addelsee, sccart, and heybubbles)

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:amazing installation, I really appreciate d interactive moment with d kids, it’s really a perfect way to animate them, for sure for them big pleasure to be part of this game. ..but to be observer of this magnificent transformation of white dream into colorful dimension full with children spirit is inspiring. at least for me! 😉

:good job! that's what we call engaged #conceptual art!

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?u wish to be a child so u could be able to be part of this installation, u like d dot story, have u seen something similar to this before. .. u can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og ::: #facebook page

:corals in ur brain ..or maybe on ur screen?!

.Interactive and architectural design project about Buzios’ Coral Reef Park

?have u been deep inside d sea, diving trough ur water dream? Wonderful video that shows d video art work that takes u deep inside d sea. ..imagine & ur clothes will still be dry!

:it’s about art project where we see interactive projections of d corals life in this Park, and d visitors with d help of d touch screen can use d mapping application that guides u where d special corals are, so u have d ability to see them from close and do more researches for this types. This interactive way of communication with d visitors brings d knowledge about the corals closer then ever, with this system of education we can go far more forward in d evolution that we’re expecting. SuperUber have exactly this as one of their tasks, and they have pretty good program they implement everywhere. The sense that they put on d modern, contemporary art is just simply unique, where we can see amazing communication in d forms besides d use of d materials, like in this case here more technology & intelligent tools.

:Bright future we have with guys like this!

What we read: 

from the SuperUber web page for this Interactive and architectural design project about Buzios’ Coral Reef Park is:

Interactive screens, synchronized projections and corals on display are part of the interactive and architectural design project created by SuperUber for the Buzios’ Coral Reef Park Visitor Center,located in one of the most popular spots in the city: Rua das Pedras. The exhibition’s  visual concept creates an immersive environment with shapes inspired by coral patterns, which together form a mosaic of images, made of videos, animations, corals and information, with themes such as preservation, oceanography and environmental education. The visitors center is permanent and opento the public starting December 9th. It shows research from Projeto Coral Vivo (Live Corals Project),and is sponsored by Petrobras through the Petrobras Environmental Program.


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Project made in hope to raise more consciousness about d life care that we need to share & to keep d protection mood for d environment with all her beauties.

What is more interesting here is SuperUber that declares that combines a creative atelier with a technology lab and its unique design style, to create multimedia and interactive projects for culture, education, entertainment and advertising. Pretty nice combination, unity in great project. iWish support for this group, looking forward to see more from then in future!

:what about this sea project, what do u think? Do you know smt about SuperUber?You can leave ur comments below or on :d white b[l]og facebook page

!let go ::: #electro

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The Japanese Popstars Feat. Green Velvet - Let Go

:this animation video is amazing layer for d great song, or d opposite direction d track is great layer for this illustrations that can blow ur mind. I really like this street style drawings, mixed like a creature that is changing d perspectives, inside, outsides, eyes..etc.

.d colors are so soft and disco in same time, pretty modern and stunning how this combination is moved by d rhythm & d dynamic of this story.

From king motion pictures we read:

This is a perfect example of a great video taking an already sick song to the next level. Let’s face it, the song by itself is fire. It’s got that perfect blend of live drums and live bass layered over techno synth and heavily produced vocals – indie dance performed with sublime perfection. The record treads that tightrope between raw and over-produced, but never falls off. The result is a track bursting with the energy of a live show with the quality of a solid studio effort.

Let Go conveys all the elements of a successful dance song: driving rhythm, catchy hook, bumping synths, and an awesome drop.

The real success of this video is that it captures the driving rhythm of the song to perfection. The record takes a rock solid bass riff and pushes it through different tones as it builds towards the big drop.

The video picks up on this theme perfectly with its mind-bending loops that slowly evolve and blend into something completely different. That creepy face with the radiation goggles is a psychotic representation of the voice on the track, but it fits in perfectly in the trippy world the creative minds behind this video dream up.

What really gets me going about this video is how it keeps moving with the song. The synch between the animation and the music is perfect – not quite the same effect as this classic Chemical Brothers cut, but definitely along these lines. Plus, the band gets an appearance at 1:38 without taking up too much screen time, and fitting in perfectly with the theme of the video.

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For its awesome pop-art feel, its trippy imagery, and its driving pace, this video gets huge respect.  Check out the making of the video here.

Directed by David Wilson
Produced by Serena Noorani and Tamsin Glasson at Colonel Blimp ( colonelblimp.com )
Commissioned by Nicola Brown for Virgin/EMI
Primary Illustrator – Keaton Henson
Secondary Illustrators – David Wilson and Andres Guzman
Drawn Animation – Malcolm Draper, Matt Lloyd, Ed Suckling, Toby Jackman, Elena Pomares, David Wilson, Jamie Page
Flash Animation – Michael Zauner, John Malcolm Moore, Ed Suckling, Toby Jackman, Elena Pomares, Andrew Clark
After Effects Compositing and Effects – Andy Montague via The Mill
Colouring – Christopher Wright, Sally Hancox, Zoe Hough, Alex Simpson, Josh Stocker

via @Gulakci & @Patarci :D